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Visit Glorious England!

Soaked in history and beauty – the British Isles should be considered a priority for any self-respecting traveller. If you have never visited ‘this sceptred isle’ before then there are a thousand reasons to tempt you over – I hope to show you just a portion, in the hopes you may discover the rest.

Avebury Stone Circle

Avebury henge and stone circles are one of the greatest marvels of prehistoric Britain.

History
England is a fascinating tapestry of history, threads from all our many disparate periods interweave to create the stunningly complex picture you see today. Great Britain became an island around 5600 BC, when it completed its gradual break off from the European sub-continent. And since then the island has been a hub of human history, much of which is still visible, especially as we hurtle through the millennia. 

Throughout the country there is still evidence of prehistoric human life, the arcane roots of British history. Nowhere is this better seen than in the Southwest, England’s Neolithic heartland. Here you can see Stonehenge, the most striking of England’s ancient monuments. This 5,000-year-old site is as ancient as the Great Pyramid at Giza and just as mysterious and is complemented by a landscape littered with similarly ancient monuments – like Avebury Stone circle.

Leaping forward, our island couldn’t avoid European history for long as the Romans first invaded in 55BC, before becoming our masters in 87 BC. During there dominion they erected thousands of buildings across the country in their bold classical style. You are never far from Roman history in England, but the best sites include: the roman baths in Bath (I wonder where the town got its name?), which are stunningly well preserved or Fishbourne Palace in Chichester. Or, for the traveller who wants to stray all the way to the Anglo-Scottish border, Hadrian’s wall is a true wonder of this isle.

Despite plummeting into the dark ages after the Roman’s departure, we soon recovered and a whole procession of Kings and Queens sculpted this county into its current shape with varying degrees of grandeur. Now our country is beset with castles – over 1500 in total (in various states of repair!). Some of the best to see today include, Warwick Castle or Dover Castle. Or why not visit Hampton Court, built by Thomas Wolsey before he was executed, and the property was seized by Henry VIII.

Or if you would prefer the relatively modern castles, the royal family currently have 26 royal residences, some of which you can visit such as Buckingham Palace or Windsor Castle. Or, some of the UK’s most historic and breath-taking homes are open to the public. The National Trust alone owns of 200 stately homes, and there are more still, each one a cornucopia of history and its own miniature tapestry of famous names and events: try Blenheim Palace, Chatsworth House or Highclere Castle.

Salisbury Cathedral

Explore over 800 years of history at Salisbury Cathedral, one of the UK’s most iconic medieval buildings with an award-winning welcome. Discover our original 1215 Magna Carta, one of only four in the world, and explore its legacy in an interactive exhibition

Beauty
Although the surface of England is strewn with sites of historical significance, (many of which are beautiful in their own rights), the landscape of England is also as various and beautiful as any country in the world. And this natural beauty is evident all over! There are 13 national parks in England and Wales, all of which are uniquely stunning. Try the austere attraction of the new Forest, or the Tranquil majesty of the Lake District, or perhaps the mysterious Dartmoor and Exmoor, or the heady Peak District.

We have hardly scratched the surface of the burgeoning history this island represents and could hardly illustrate the wondrous sumptuousness of the place. The marriage of these two cornerstones of tourism is what makes England so special to visit and it really has to be seen to be believed – so visit glorious England!

The Small Group Touring Company operate unique mini coach day tours and extended U.K sightseeing tours throughout Britain.

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St George’s Day: What does it mean and why do we celebrate the patron Saint of England?

St. George’s Day takes place on April 23rd every year, recognising the patron saint of England apparently made famous for slaying a dragon and saving a distressed maiden

St-George

It’s the one day of the year, apart from major football tournaments, when you are guaranteed to see English flags being waved proudly across the country.

April 23 is a national day of celebration about all things English.

But St George’s Day isn’t honoured as widely as those of other patron saints – St Patrick being a notable example.

Very little is known about St George, his annual feast, or why we celebrate him.

Here are all the facts you need to know about England’s national day.

St George’s Day is celebrated on April 23 every year.

It is honoured by various Christian churches and by the several nations, kingdoms, countries, and cities of which St George is the patron saint.

St George’s Day was named as early as 1222 – but only one in five people in England actually know what day it’s on.

In 1415 St George’s Day became a national feast day and holiday in England. But after the union with Scotland in the 18th century it ceased to become a national holiday.

Now most people only mark the day with a flag.

Historically people would wear a rose on their chests. Roses became a symbol of the patron saint because a beautiful bloom is thought to have grown on his grave. This also came from a tradition in Catalonia in Spain – of which St George is also a patron saint – where women would give men a book and receive a rose in return on the feast day.

William Shakespeare is thought to have been born and died on the same date as St George, so you can celebrate with games and acting workshops at the Globe Theatre as well as traditional hog roasts and medieval-themed frolicking.

Who was St George?

The patron saint of England has become famous from stories that he slayed a dragon and saved a distressed maiden.

But actually very little is known about his life that is not myth and legend.

He is believed to have been born in Palestine in the 3rd Century AD to Christian parents and is also the patron saint of many other places around the world.

St George is thought to have first lived in Lydda, near modern day Tel Aviv.

He was a soldier in the Roman Army like his father and quickly rose up the ranks. He was later tortured and a number of medieval tales detail the awful punishments he was said to have endured – including being boiled and crushed between spiked wheels – because he refused to give up his Christian faith.

He was executed on the 23rd April 303 AD for refusing to stop being a Christian when asked by Emperor Diocletian – who had begun a campaign against Christians.

St George is believed to have been dragged through the streets of Lydda in Palestine and then beheaded for refusing to renounce his faith.

His life and suffering also inspired medals for valour and bravery.

The George Cross is the highest such award that a civilian can earn and is awarded for extraordinary bravery and courage in the face of extreme danger. The George Medal is second behind it.

Both medals depict the patron saint slaying the dragon atop his mighty steed, as detailed in myths about the patron saint.

Other things St George is the patron saint of include farmers and other agricultural workers, butchers, horses, horseriders and saddlemakers, and also soldiers.

He was also later made patron saint of Scouting because of his ideals.

And, unfortunately he has also become known as the patron saint of a number of diseases including herpes, leprosy, skin diseases and syphilis. Some legends state this is due to him helping others.

Why is he patron saint of England?

St George represents traditional English chivalry and bravery, but he was not actually English at all.

In fact, he never even set foot on British shores.

The heroic story of St George became popular in 1483, when it was published in a book called The Golden Legend.

The decision to make him patron saint was made by King Edward III when he formed the Order of the Garter in St George’s name in 1350. The badge of the order depicts George slaying a dragon.

April 23, supposedly the date of his death in 303 AD, was adopted in the early 13th Century, as the date of the annual celebration.

The cult of the St George was further advanced by Henry V at the battle of Agincourt.

Before the armies clashed, Shakespeare had the immortal phrase: “Cry God for Harry, England and St. George.”

Many believed they had seen the saint fighting for the English – further cementing his place in history. In 1415 St George became the official patron saint of England.

England’s flag is the emblem that Saint George famously wore on his shield or banner.

Richard the Lionheart adopted it in the 12th century, and soldiers wore the Red Cross to distinguish themselves from the enemy in battle.

St George is also the patron saint of several other countries – including Germany, Portugal, Greece, Bulgaria, Georgia, Palestine, Ethiopia, Serbia, Slovinia, Lithuania, Portugal, Malta and Montenegro.

Did he really slay a dragon?

In a word, no. It’s easy to forget, but dragons don’t actually exist.

The legend tells of a single well in the village of Silene, guarded by the ferocious beast. Villagers had been giving it sheep to stop it attacking people, and then started sacrificing humans.

St George arrived just as a princess was about to be offered and like a true hero saved her in the nick of time, according to the Golden Legend. The King is then said to have set up a church of Our Lady and St George.

Medieval chronicler Jacobus de Voragine compiled similarly bizarre stories about other saints in his book Golden Legend and is entirely to blame for his association with the story.

The book was something of a bestseller.

Read the full story in The Mirror Online

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